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Archive for the ‘Debian’ Category

LXer Article

In the LXWR this week we have part 1 and 2 of Steven Rosenberg’s farewell to Fedora. why Glyn Moody is rooting for Microsoft, a long overdue look at XFCE, Dr. Tony Young’s final (or is it?) installment in his switching to KDE 4.4 adventures and the Linux foundation releases their annual list of who writes Linux. Enjoy!

Goodbye Fedora, welcome back Debian, Part 1: I really did like Fedora 13. I liked it enough to solve more than a handful of problems. I liked it enough to use a proprietary graphics driver for the first time (didn’t like that; not only was it outside the package-management system and hard to update, it didn’t perform so well either). I love the Fedora community, the openness that’s everywhere, the lack of pretense. But just as everything was roses, furry kittens and such when I first ran Fedora 13 with the 2.6.33 Linux kernel, it started to go dark with the change — in mid-cycle, mind you — to the 2.6.34 kernel.

Open Source Does Not Need Monetising: It’s common to hear commentators and business leaders justifying practices that wouldn’t be recognised as “open source” by many of us on the grounds that they have to make money somehow. Actions that deny the software freedoms of end users – and even developers – appear like a fungus, spuriously justified by the need for profit. Phrases like “we can’t give everything away” garnish the thought, and it’s easy to be drawn into sympathising with them. But they are wrong. Open source itself is not about making money – that’s the job of its participants. Open source is the pragmatic product and projection of software freedom.

How a “Welded-to KDE 3.5 User” Began a Move to KDE 4.4 – Part 2: In this second part of a two part guest editorial and tutorial Dr. Tony Young (an Australian Mycologist by trade) shares his trials, tribulations, successes and disappointments in working with the new version of KDE. In this installment he configures media players, K3b, Crossover Office, Lucid and Post Script and his final thoughts on his adventures.

Why I’m Rooting for Microsoft: It will not have escaped your notice that the patent system has been the subject of several posts on this blog, or that the general tenor is pretty simple: it’s broken, and nowhere more evidently so than for software. Anyone can see that, but what is much harder is seeing how to fix it given the huge vested interests at work here.

The bad guys are worried – did we win?: Recently two pieces of first class anti-free software diatribe hit the headlines. The first is Microsoft’s “please don’t use OpenOffice.org” video and the second is Steve Jobs’ anti-Android rant. Both are pretty shallow attempts at deflection and have been rightly called out as actually endorsing the subject of the attack as a valid opponent. In both cases it does seem to say that Microsoft and Jobs are concerned enough about OpenOffice.org and Android respectively that they need to tell the rest of us how bad they are.

6 Best Linux Terminal Applications for Linux: A Quake-style terminal is a drop-down terminal which can be shown/hidden just like the console in Quake (and most of the first-person shooter games out there), using the press of a key (~ in Quake). Guake is a terminal application written in GTK which uses the F12 keyboard shortcut by default to show or hide it.

Goodbye Fedora, welcome back Debian, Part 2: Review of Debian Squeeze: I’ve been keeping my eye on Debian Squeeze (and Sid) for the past few months via live images, and in the course of the release’s life there have been changes in the application lineup. Notable inclusions in the now-frozen Squeeze are the Ubuntu Software Center as an alternative way of managing applications. Yep, you read right: Debian is using the Ubuntu Software Center. It looks like Debian’s developers are in a more cooperative mood than they get credit for. I for one am glad to see such cross-pollination between Ubuntu and Debian.

A Long Overdue Look at XFCE: Here at MakeTechEasier, we’ve covered Linux desktop issues of all kinds, and we’ve examined desktop environments both well known (Gnome and KDE) as well as somewhat obscure (Window Maker, LXDE). For some reasons, we’ve never taken a close look at the very popular XFCE desktop environment. It’s nearly as feature-rich as Gnome, but with a smaller footprint. As it’s been a big name in the Linux desktop world for quite a few years now, it seems we’re long overdue to check out this polished and useful collection of software.

World Wildlife Fund WWF format cracked!: I heard about the new .WWF format this morning. It is an initiative of the World Wildlife Fund to prevent people printing .PDF files. As a matter of fact, it is a .PDF format, but slightly modified and with the “no printing” flag enabled. But I don’t like it when people are forbidding me something. It is sending the wrong message. So I set out to crack it.

Who Writes Linux?: This is an annual report published by The Linux Foundation that measures the the rate of Linux kernel development, who is doing it (developer names) and who is sponsoring it (company names). It has become an annual check on the state of the world’s largest open source project and collaborative development effort.

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LXer Article

In this week’s Roundup we have; What makes Linux compelling to use? Ubuntu moves away from GNOME, Learning Linux the hardcore way with Linux from scratch, Microsoft is a dying consumer brand, Why Unity in Ubuntu is good for the future and Ronald trip’s response to why Unity is clouding up the desktop. Enjoy!

Linux: What Makes Linux Compelling to Use?: I find Linux to be an excellent general purpose computing platform for day to day personal and small business use. I like the fact that Linux does not cost me money. No, my time is not worthless, but I have wisely spent the time I needed learning how to install, configure and use Linux and the free, open source software that comes with it.

Leaving the OpenOffice.org project: Today is a special day. I feel both sad and relieved, happy and somewhat disgusted. I have officially resigned from all my duties, roles and positions inside the OpenOffice.org project. My resignation is effective immediately and I am leaving the project. I will now be contributing to the Document Foundation, while of course continuing to work at Ars Aperta and at the OASIS as a member of its Board of Director, eGov Steering Committee and ODF Committees. These past days have been tense. In a sense it was to be expected, but on the other hand I feel that it was in fact quite surprising and unprofessional.

Ubuntu moves away from GNOME: The big news at the Ubuntu Developer Summit? Moving to Unity as the default interface for Ubuntu Desktop with Natty Narwhal (11.04), rather than GNOME Shell. Earlier this year, Canonical representatives had to deny that they were forking GNOME with the work on the Unity interface. (Quick disclaimer, I’m a GNOME Member and help out with GNOME PR.) Unity is a Canonical-sponsored project that was initially delivered for the Ubuntu Netbook Remix. GNOME Shell is the interface being developed for GNOME 3.0, which was delayed to spring 2011. Apparently, Canonical were being asked the wrong question. During the opening keynote, Mark Shuttleworth has announced that Canonical is committing to making Unity the default desktop experience “for users that have the appropriate software and hardware.”

What’s The Fastest Linux Filesystem On Cheap Flash Media?: Compact Flash and SD storage cards are everywhere; gigabytes for cheap in a tiny form factor. Most come formatted with VFAT. So what is the fastest Linux filesystem for these little devices? Flash drives and SD Cards are getting bigger, faster and cheaper. They’re not just for sucking down snaps from your pocket camera any more: they’re backup storage, portable homedirs, netbook expansion … you name it.

Learning Linux the hardcore way: Linux From Scratch: I was excited to see that the Linux From Scratch (hereafter, LFS) project just released a new and stable documentation “build” for version 6.7 this past September. I have known about the LFS project for many years but I didn’t start experimenting with it until not too long ago.

Why Unity in Ubuntu is good for the future..: The hype is all about cloud and the end of the desktop as we know it. The recent move from a “pure” gnome desktop to Unity by Ubuntu/Canonical is clearly a sign that of a fast-track type of (r)evolution. Why is it good for the key-players (Ubuntu/Debian, Canonical, Gnome and … the User), what are the risk associated with this somehow bold move?

Microsoft is a dying consumer brand: After several missteps, MS is dying as a consumer brand. Consumers have turned their backs on Microsoft. A company that once symbolized the future is now living in the past. Microsoft has been late to the game in crucial modern technologies like mobile, search, media, gaming and tablets. It has even fallen behind in Web browsing, a market it once ruled with an iron fist.

Using an IMG instead of an ISO to put Debian on a USB Flash drive: Now that I have a laptop that boots from USB, I’ve been using IMG images instead of ISOs when they’re available to test new Linux and BSD systems because they’re so easy to deal with.

Adoption of Unity is the Most Significant Change Ever for Ubuntu, Says Mark Shuttleworth: It’s going to be Unity all the way for Ubuntu’s next major release codenamed Ubuntu 11.04 “Natty Narwhal”. During Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) at Florida, Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth announced that the Unity shell will become Ubuntu’s default interface not just for netbook editions, but also for Ubuntu desktop editions.

Unity Clouding Up The Desktop: Mr. Des Ligneris wrote that the adoption of Unity is a bold move and a good one for Canonical and Ubuntu, as the focus of computing is shifting wholesale to the internet and “The Cloud”. It is an interesting viewpoint from Mr. Des Ligneris. I don’t see the Unity plans as a blessing though. There is no point in turning a full fledged desktop machine into a “Mobile Internet Device”. Their use cases don’t overlap. While a desktop is certainly capable of performing MID tasks, it is not the intended operating area of a desktop machine.

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LXer Article

In this week’s Roundup we have more on the Oracle – Google lawsuit, how corporate America went open source, games that transmit GPS coordinates, converting eBooks, a space elevator and a Happy 17th Birthday to Debian. Enjoy!

Google vows to fight Oracle lawsuit as Java creator speaks out: Google has vowed to fight Oracle’s patent lawsuit over use of Java patents in Android, claiming that Android’s Dalvik implementation is not covered. Meanwhile, Java creator James Gosling blogs that neither side in the lawsuit is without blame, but calls the suit a victory for “ego, money and power” at the expense of open software development, says eWEEK.

How corporate America went open-source: There was a time when open-source software was the domain of computer geeks and do-it-yourselfers with more time than money. But, as Oracle’s legal salvo against Google highlighted last week, those days are long gone. Oracle (ORCL), through its purchase of Sun Microsystems, has become one of the largest purveyors of open-source software in the world. Google (GOOG) makes the open-source and increasingly ubiquitous Android smartphone operating system.

Android game secretly transmits GPS coordinates : In a post on their Connect blog, security specialist Symantec reports on a new trojan for Android that masquerades as a free Tap Snake game, while secretly transmitting GPS coordinates to a server in the background. These coordinates can then be retrieved and displayed in Google Maps via the GPS Spy Android app sold for €5 by the same vendor, Maxicom. According to Symantec, the Tap Snake process can’t easily be killed and continues to run in the background.

Convert eBooks in Linux: Say you just bought an Amazon Kindle or a Barnes and Noble Nook. You want to convert your eBook collection to .EPUB or .MOBI format. For this, install Calibre. The application not only provides you with a graphical way to manage your eBook collection, but also comes with a set of useful command-line tools. One of these is ebook-convert. This tool can help you convert between tens of standard formats like EPUB, FB2, LIT, LRF, MOBI, OEB, PDB, PDF, PML, RB, RTF, TCR, TXT, HTML and more. Even CBR and CBZ (comic book formats) are supported.

A Space Elevator in <7: Future software advancements like cars that drive themselves will trigger a new perspective on whether we can build a space elevator, and in what timeframe.

Oracle scorns open source: How to respond?: As I’ve noted, I don’t claim to have any insight into how this lawsuit will conclude, whether it will blow up into a long and bloody battle between Oracle and Google, or whether it will be concluded by some quick and relatively amicable solution. But I do believe that whatever happens, whatever it might nominally “win”, Oracle has certainly and irrevocably lost more in terms of trust and goodwill within the free software world than it will ever understand. The message is clear: Fork all the main open source projects that Oracle owns or transfer energies to a replacement.

7 Sources of Free Sounds for Multimedia Projects: In my posts 11 Techy Things for Teachers to Try This Year and How To Do 11 Techy Things In the New School Year I mentioned podcasting and video creation. When creating podcasts and videos adding music and other sounds can enhance your students’ presentations. Here are seven tools that your students can use find and or create sounds for their multimedia presentations.

How Oracle might kill Google’s Android and software patents all at once: In reality, Oracle is a major proponent of open software, pushing Linux and taking a stand against the notion of software patents themselves. Yes, that’s right, the company filing the year’s biggest software patent infringement case is also a major critic of the idea of software patents in general. When somebody points a gun at you, you point one back even if you don’t like the idea of guns. You might even shoot first. Oracle likes Linux so much that it funds Btrfs, a GPL licensed, futuristic and advanced new file system that supports pooling, snapshots, checksums, and other features that sound a lot like Sun’s ZFS, which Oracle now also owns. The difference is that Oracle didn’t mire Btrfs in legal quandary the way Sun did with ZFS before Oracle bought them.

Like it or Not: It is a Windows World: “If you don’t like Windows so much then don’t use it!” This is something I have been told more than once (sometimes in not those kind of words) by various people when we have been discussing operating systems. As much as I would like to take their suggestion, the fact is I can’t.

Why Oracle was right to sue Google: The tech industry loves a good vendor slugfest, and the upcoming legal battle between Google and Oracle has all the makings of a truly spectacular one. At issue is Dalvik, the unique, Java-based runtime at the heart of Google’s Android smartphone OS. Oracle, which gained stewardship of the Java platform when it bought Sun Microsystems in 2009, claims Dalvik knowingly, willfully, and deliberately infringes on Java intellectual property. According to a complaint filed with the U.S. District Court in San Francisco last week, Oracle is seeking a halt to any further Android development, destruction of all infringing Android software, and for Google to pay damages, both actual and statutory.

Happy 17th Birthday to Debian!: It was on August 16th, 1993 that Ian Murdock started the Debian Project. Named after he and his Wife with the idea of a ‘distribution’ collaborated on openly by people all over the world. Thank You Ian, seventeen years later Debian still rocks.

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LXer Article

In the LXWR this week we have Munich showing off its migration to Linux at CeBIT, Ubuntu opens up a music store, a nice review of OpenShot, Jeff Hoogland mints his girlfriends laptop, the three giants of Linux and a LXer feature about contributing upstream..enjoy!

Microsoft Hoist by its Own Anti-Anti-Competitive Petard: Microsoft has a problem: it wants to complain about what it considers Google’s anti-competitive behaviour. Unfortunately, all the arguments Microsoft made when it was being targetted for anti-competitive behaviour – that it was simply “successful” and “innovative” – can be used by Google too. So Microsoft finds itself arguing against itself – and looking ridiculous.

CeBIT 2010: City of Munich Shows Migration to Linux and OpenOffice: The consolidated IT of the city of Munich is reporting at CeBIT 2010 on converting their workstations to Linux and OpenOffice. The migration to the free office package was finalized for Munich. All 15,000 office PCs of the city council will work on OpenOffice, under Linux or Windows.

Sub $200 Android tablets arrives: is the iPad doomed?: When the $499 iPad tablet was announced last month, many journalists commented that the device was surprisingly affordable for an Apple product. This may not be the case however, as several sub $200 competitors running Google Android operating system have appeared. Will the iPad be able to gain major market share when it costs more than twice the price of other tablets or is the iPad doomed to be a “high-end only” product like the Mac?

Ubuntu One Music Store is Coming to Rock Your World: The news has been confirmed. Ubuntu One Music Store is how it is going to be called. And it will be there by default in Rythmbox Music Player in Ubuntu Lucid 10.04. And that is NOT welcome because most of us don’t use Rythmbox at all. But hold on, Ubuntu One Music Store is going to have a plug-in support as well. That is sweet!

Firefox may never hit 25 percent market share: Firefox is on a decline. It may not be as steady as Internet Explorer’s death spiral, and it certainly has not been going on for as long, but if the last three months are any indication, Firefox will never hit that 25 percent market share mark that looked all but certain just a few short months ago. Meanwhile, Chrome is still pushing steadily forward; in fact, it was the only browser to show positive growth last month.

OpenShot – Finally, An Excellent Free Video Editor For Linux: Video and photo editing tools are a necessity in today’s world of personal media. We have lots of photographs and videos these days that could look even better when presented nicely. The tool should be powerful yet simple to use so that average Joe can use it easily. Windows and Mac have had good video editing tools for sometime now, Linux had a big void in this area until recently. The void has been filled by OpenShot. It is truly amazing and the best, free video editor out there for Linux, suiting the needs of many. OpenShot will be available via Ubuntu Software Center starting with Lucid Lynx. Till then you would have to add the PPA to software sources.

Minting the Girlfriend: A few weeks back the girl I have been dating for awhile now had idly made a complaint about her laptop being poky at certain tasks. I’d used the thing once or twice to check my email and recalled it was running Vista – no surprise there. I like this girl a lot and figured it was time to take that next step in our relationship: I offered to put Linux on her laptop.

Improve Internet Health with a Microsoft Tax? : Somebody better tell Microsoft that it’s still March, because the suggestion of an “Internet usage tax” to fight Windows-powered botnets must be an April Fool’s joke let out a month too early. According to Robert McMillan’s piece on ComputerWorld, Scott Charney (Microsoft’s veep for Trustworthy Computing) suggests that one way to fund fighting botnets is to tax users. “You could say it’s a public safety issue and do it with general taxation.” You could, but let’s not.

Vermont Adopts Open Source Software Policy: Vermont has become the latest government to enact an open source software policy, after Secretary of Administration Neale F. Lunderville recently signed a policy developed under state CIO David Tucker’s leadership. The policy says the Vermont Department of Information and Innovation and other departments should look at open source solutions as part of the procurement process, and are directed to calculate the total cost of ownership for an open source system, including “fixed costs (direct purchases and licensing) and operational costs for support, testing, upgrades, maintenance and training,” as part of the procurement process.

Ubuntu dumps the brown, introduces new theme and branding: Canonical has revealed the style of the new default theme that will be used in Ubuntu 10.04, the next major version of the popular Linux distribution. In a significant departure from tradition, Ubuntu is shedding its signature brown color scheme and is adopting a new look with a palette that includes orange and an aubergine shade of purple.

LXer Feature – Contributing Upstream: An Editorial: The foundations of Linux, with how it has been developed and when we look at the Debian model on which Ubuntu is based, the contributions of developers by and large are because of their common interests and a willingness to accept conceptualizations. In recently viewing an interview with Mark Shuttleworth these contributions were stated. Passing on the valor per-say to that foundation and the current developers engaged in the Ubuntu project.

The Three Giants of Linux: The Linux ecosystem is a complex entity. On one hand everyone gets along and benefits from work done by others, while on the other there’s often animosity and conflict between distributions and their communities (remember when Ubuntu came along?). People often complain that there is simply too much choice in the Linux world and that we’d all be better off if there was just one, or two. However, nothing could be further from the truth. The multitude of Linux distributions exists for a reason. They exist because not one single distribution can satisfy the desires of every user on the planet. Different people like different ways of doing things. Not only that, the distribution that one might want to use for a server won’t necessarily suit a laptop. So thankfully there are thousands of distros to choose from.

Windows is Easier, Just Like Stabbing Your Own Eyeballs is Easier: Windows is all about walls. It’s nothing but barriers. Want to do something? The answer is no. You know what the worst part of trying to troubleshoot and fix any Windows PC is? The endless waiting. Waiting for it to reboot. Waiting for hung processes to finish whatever they are doing. Waiting for apps to install or uninstall, and why is that always so dog-slow? For extra amusement, hook up a sniffer like Wireshark or tcpdump just to watch how many Windows apps phone home.

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LXer Article

Linux: Access 100+ Games Instantly With DJL: For those who always feel that gaming is not suitable in Linux OS and it is always an hassle to install and get games to run in Linux platform, then DJL will definitely change the way you think. Djl is an open-source (GPL licensed) game manager written in Python 2.5 for the GNU/Linux Operating Systems. In short, it is an application that allows you to install/uninstall/manage your games easily. With Djl, you can browse through its repository of 100+ games and install the game you want with a simple click. No longer do you need to worry about game dependencies and all the command lines.

10 of the Best Free Linux Relational Databases: To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 10 open source Relational Database Management Systems. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to store data in an efficient way.

Is there a best distro?: Yesterday, I had a good friend ask me What is the best Linux distribution to familiarize myself with Linux? This was not someone who is unfamiliar with technology, or UNIX for that matter, but someone who is one of us, which made the question difficult to answer.

SCO boots boss McBride: Unix code claimant SCO Group has jettisoned its controversial captain, Darl McBride, as part of the company’s latest scheme to emerge from bankruptcy. The serially litigious SCO’s executive ousting was revealed in a filing today with US regulators, although corresponding paperwork gives McBride’s actual dismissal date as October 14. The decision to remove McBride was done under the auspices of the Chapter 11 bankruptcy trustee assigned to SCO by the US Justice Department. That leaves COO, Jeff Hunsaker, CFO, Ken Nielsen, and General Counsel, Ryan Tibbitts grappling for the helm.

10 things to do after installing Linux: You’ve finally decided to try Linux. The installation went without a hitch (they usually do these days) and you’ve got a shiny new desktop sitting in front of you. What do you do next? It’s a whole world of limitless possibilities. Thanks to the nature of open-source development, thousands of applications, games, tools and utilities can be installed with just a few mouse clicks.

Ubuntu Linux powers up: Just how important are computer operating systems, anyway? We’re going to get an indication Thursday morning, when Microsoft Corp. is scheduled to launch Windows 7, successor to the much-maligned Windows Vista and what many critics believe is the replacement for Windows XP that Vista should have been. XP will be exactly eight years old next Sunday, and that is kind of old. In late August, Apple Inc. launched Snow Leopard, which has had a good reception among users and critics. I’ve reviewed Snow Leopard and shall review Windows 7 in due course. My early impressions of Win7 are positive, however.

Fedora 12 beta code is go: Red Hat has announced the first and only beta of its next Linux development release, Fedora 12. Emperor Constantine the Great knew a good means to hold a crumbling empire together when he saw it – namely, Christianity – and by code-naming the 12th release of Fedora after Constantine, Red Hat is by no means suggesting that the Linux empire is crumbling or that the warring between the political, military, and religious powers that led to Constantine’s ascension to rule is somehow also going on in the Linux arena. Rather, Red Hat is emphasizing Constantine’s openness to new ideas.

Netherlands: Police forces to use open source software ‘where possible’: The Dutch police force will move to open source wherever that is possible, but not exclusively, a spokesperson said this week, correcting a statement published by Linux distributor Red Hat a week ago.

Stallman calls on EU to set MySQL free: Richard Stallman demanded the EU cut MySQL loose from Oracle yesterday in an open letter to Brussels’ competition supremo Neelie Kroes. The self-described software freedom activist’s intervention came just a day after MySQL founder Monty Widenius made a similar call, saying that Oracle could offset the EU’s go-slow examination of its purchase of Sun by simply putting MySQL on the block. In yesterday’s letter, also signed by James Love and Malini Aisola of Knowledge Ecology International and Jim Killock of the Open Rights Group Stallman says that Oracle’s objective in borging MySQL is to prevent further market share erosion and “to protect the high prices now charged for its proprietary database software licenses and services”.

Hannah Montana Linux: Meet Hannah Montana Linux or HML for short. Hannah Montana Linux is a unix-like Linux Operating System based on Kubuntu.

Browsers in Linux: They own your CPU (and do so in Windows and Mac, too): I laugh — LAUGH! — when a tech journalist writes something to the effect of, “for lightweight tasks such as Web browsing,” when you know, and I know, that there ain’t nothing light about using present-day Web browser on present-day Web pages filled with Javascript, Flash and enough CSS to fill a book.

LXer Book Review: Pro Linux System Administration: “By the end of this book, You’ll be well on your way to becoming a Linux expert” is quite a bold claim for a book that is aimed at people who only have some familiarity with Windows and networking. “Pro Linux System Administration” by James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink and Dennis Matotek aims to do precisely that and surprisingly, it largely succeeds. In its 1080 pages it explains how you can set up and configure multiple Linux servers to operate a small business network. Starting with basic Linux management and working up the stack through networking, e-mail and webservers you will end up with a pretty complete network that includes document management, groupware and disaster recovery.

Cloud Computing: Good or Bad for Open Source?: Cloud computing: you may have heard of it. It seems to be everywhere these days, and if you believe the hype, there’s a near-unanimous consensus that it’s the future. Actually, a few of us have our doubts, but leaving that aside, I think it’s important to ask where does open source stand if the cloud computing vision *does* come to fruition? Would that be a good or bad thing for free software?

Why Adobe likes open source: He’s the man who brought open source to Silicon Graphics and NEC and advisor to Warburg Pincus on how to make money investing in open source. “At one point I got the title of open source’s undercover agent,” recalls Dave McAllister. He was recruited by Adobe as Director of open source and standards with a specific mission: “I was hired to, a) start an open source process and, b) get PDF approved as an ISO standard.” So: mission accomplished?

Linux Netbooks: They’re Still Out There: Suddenly I was surveying the market again for a good buy on a netbook preloaded with Linux. I found a wide variety of systems with Linux available from mainstream outlets and factory direct, at least here in the United States where I live. While I don’t have updated market share figures it’s clear, despite claims by Microsoft and their supporters, that Linux remains entrenched in the netbook market and is spreading out from there.

Ubuntu 9.10 Netbook Performance: There is just one week left until Ubuntu 9.10 “Karmic Koala” will be released, but is it worth the upgrade if you are running a netbook? From our testing of the development releases, it is most certainly worth the upgrade, especially when compared to Ubuntu 9.04 with its buggy Intel driver stack that caused many problems for Atom netbook users. Ubuntu 9.10 brings many usability improvements to the Linux desktop, various new packages, and the overall system performance has improved too. We have ran a set of benchmarks on both a Dell Inspiron Mini 9 and Samsung NC10 under Ubuntu 9.04 and 9.10 to illustrate the performance gains along with a few regressions.

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LXer Article

At the beginning of the week Debian went into a deep freeze until their announced release date for Lenny on Valentine’s Day. A group of developers have brought the dark horse of file managers Midnight Commander back from a deep sleep. Jimf exposed me to midnight commander, it was way over my head at the time and in a related article Carla Schroder says you “You Get What You Pay For” that talks about projects having a hard time making ends meet. Both of which I will be talking about again soon..

Ever since KDE 4 came out it has taken a lot, and I mean a lot of heat. Not all of it undeserved but still. The story seems to be changing tune however with the latest 4.2 update. Because when you can get Glyn Moody to ask himself if Linus jumped too soon in regards Linus’s recent admission that he has switched to Gnome from KDE and get Bruce Byfield to say the wow factor has returned, you can’t be doing too bad. A story sparked a debate in the forums about the merits of making KDE work on windows and challenging Microsoft on its own turf, and whether it is a wasted effort.

Here is something I was totally unaware of, apparently Windows 7 “Starter” which will be the one of the so far announced 6 versions of Windows 7 that will be aimed at the netbook market will only be able to run three programs at a time. Only three? Really? Why? Talk about shooting yourself in the foot. I don’t mind though, I’m glad to watch. And an article that hit our newswire that spawned an online documentation project at thetuxproject.com

A recent article on the ascendant state of the WINE Project by Thomas Wickline got me to confess to how much, I have not used it. It got me thinking about it and I thought I would post this great article I found on LWN called “Common Wine Myths” Also, Tech Republic has a list of 10 obscure Linux applications you need to try that seems to have perked some interest.

I interview Jesse Trucks of LOPSA and share my opinion on “The Death of the Newspaper” and to wrap things up I have a nice piece of non-research enititled Netbook Linux at a Crossroads and Ken Hess asks “Are You Smart Enough To Use Linux?” Great way to alienate prospective Linux users Ken, telling them that Linux is really complicated and that they are probably too stupid to use it makes me ask, are you a Linux advocate, Windows advocate or just trolling?

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LXer Article

Welcome to the first LXer Roundup of 2009, I hope your new year was a good one. ChannelWeb has a list of what they think are the 10 Coolest Open Source products of 2008 and Phoronix has their take on the great Linux innovations of 2008. Bruce Byfield gives us his list of the seven most influential Linux distributions. I like the list overall but I think it should include Damn Small Linux.

At around midnight Pacific Time all the 30GB Zunes froze. Why? Because 2009 has an extra leap second. Not a whole day, but just one second. TG Daily talks about Internet Explorer’s continued market share decline and how Mozilla is picking up roughly 2 out of every 3 people who switch away from it. With Google saying IE6 is not secure and actively pushing Chrome, it is making even the casual computer user ask themselves what else they can use to surf the Internet with.

In some somber news Caitlyn Martin reports that MadTux has closed its doors for good. Its sad that the small Linux vendors that actually provide worthwhile support are feeling the pinch of the major vendors now offering Linux on some of their models. I am sure that the effects of recent economic events was a factor as well. It seems that someone has ported Google’s Android to the EEE PC and it wasn’t very hard either. So Android is the Linux OS they ‘haven’t’ been working on all this time, interesting.

The Debian Developers have decided to release Debian 5 with proprietary firmware in order to get Lenny out in a timely manner. I thought that Lenny was supposed to be completely free of any non GPL’d code? Andrew Min talks about why games are the key to Linux adoption how the big names in FOSS could be doing more about it.

To finish things up we have Dana Dana Blankenhorn’s most recent article about the biggest threat to open source in 2009. Dana has been on a roll lately but with a statement like “..but most open source lacks update services”, I am left asking myself if he has ever run Linux on anything or used any FOSS software ever. You smell what I smell?

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