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Archive for the ‘Editorial’ Category

I have finally had a chance to watch the President’s press conference so I could make sense of what I heard from pundits all day. For one, I have never seen a President asked those kind of questions by reporters with such a blatant lack of respect in their voices and demeanor. It was sickening for me to watch after a while. Not one of them would have dared to act that way to Bush Jr. or Sr, Clinton or God forbid Ronald Reagan. And just what was “it” that was asked starting in the press conference and repeated again and again by pundits afterward that he isn’t getting?

The only difference I can ascertain between Obama and every other President that has ever held office is the color of his skin. Other than that he just like all the rest, agree with me or not I don’t care. He is not any more or less trustworthy or honest or have any less skeletons in his closet than any other career politician. I have no more or less reason to trust him than any of the rest. I have never in my life seen a President get heckled during a Presidential address. Not ever, not even once. Not until Obama took office. I have never heard a President talked to, or about in the way he is talked about in the Press.

The two party system is broken, badly. We need a viable third party in this county but the Tea Party is not it. But then if they can pull all the ultra conservatives out of the Republican and Democratic parties then so be it. Maybe we need a party of crazies so we know where they are. And no, I am not kidding. I will agree we need a much smaller government and tax reform but that is never going to happen so their whole platform is a joke to me.

Why do federal level politicians get to keep receiving their salary after they have left office? And they get all the pay raises that get voted in after they have left too. And they get world class health care for them and their families for the rest of their lives and can will it to their husbands and wives when they die? They they don’t even pay into it, we the regular tax payer get to do that for them. And we expect them to willingly vote to stop that? Are you kidding?

I don’t care about gun rights because I do not own any guns and have no real plans too nor do I fret over how much my taxes are considering I don’t make that much. I don’t care about Social Security because I’m pretty sure I won’t get any and I don’t believe in God (I am a Secular Humanist) so I don’t fit in with any party. I want to know how we can get millions of non-violent criminals out of jail, but that would lose money for all the private prisons trading on wall street. I live in a country where it has somehow become good business to incarcerate people.

You will never get any kind of smaller government or tax reform with 10% or more of your population permanently behind bars and 10% permanently unemployed. That is one fifth of the population dependent on or incarcerated by the government in some form or another. Don’t forget to factor in all the businesses that work for and with the Government. It is immensely large and growing even today.  A government that has to protect you from a threat that may come from anywhere at any time (terrorism) and has to provide for you and makes money off of incarcerating you has to be big enough to do so. Which means that the government will never be big enough.

Our government will never be big enough to protect us from outside threats, protect us from ourselves and provide for us when we can’t and control us all at the same time, never. But that is more and more becoming what the Government’s job is lately, between the Patriot Act, mandatory health care, Social Security, Katrina, The BP spill, fighting two wars we shouldn’t be and the first gulf war, the corporate, auto industry and banking bailouts (again), the real estate bubble (again)..I could keep going.

The press conference made me aware of something, I guess I do not watch enough T.V. to already have known; I am going to have to wait either two or six more years to know whether I have seen the beginning of the end of something. Either the end of politics as we know it due to the total loss of respect and civility towards the President, or if it was because he was black. If after Obama leaves office all of a sudden we have respect for the office of the President then I will have learned something terribly revealing..

I am scared for the future of my country.

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LXer Article

In this week’s LXWR OpenOffice.org gets liberated, a nice review of Linux Mint, The GNU Project celebrates its 27th birthday, Jono Bacon talks about how Ubuntu gets built, a case for Linux in schools, Rad Hat’s CEO makes it on Mad Money, Microsoft sues Motorola because of Android and a LXer Feature by our own Hans Kwint on the choices Windows and Linux users both have. Enjoy!

LibreOffice: OpenOffice.org Liberated: It has been a long time coming, but finally it happened: OpenOffice.org has been forked under the name of LibreOffice. The Document Foundation will oversee the development of LibreOffice. According to the press release, “The Document Foundation is the result of a collective effort by leading independent members of the former OpenOffice.org community, including several project leads and key members of the Community Council.” Red Hat, Canonical, Google, and Novell are among the backers of The Document Foundation and the new fork.

Goodbye OpenOffice. LibreOffice, Here I Come!: I was ecstatic today to hear the news that former members of the OpenOffice.org Foundation have decided to create a fork of OpenOffice called LibreOffice. This fork will be a democratic and community-driven project, free from the dubious motivations of Oracle Corporation. I suspected that someone would eventually do something like this, but I was not expecting it so soon.

Windows users face as many choices as Linux users: A while ago, Graham Morrison wrote: “The trouble with Linux: there’s too much choice”. Implicitly, the article refers to “more choice than with Windows”. The article led to reactions from Carla Schroeder, Caitlyn Martin, Alastair Otter and Ron Miller. While the articles provided for an interesting discussion, none of them addressed the fundamentals of Linux distributions and choice of desktop software in my opinion. Because from an objective point of view, Windows users face as many choices as Linux users do. But most Windows users are just not aware of all the choices they’re making.

5 Intriguing KDE Apps : The beauty of an open development platform is that anyone can take a stab at creating an application. KDE, which is built upon the Qt application and UI framework, is a shining example of this. A quick look at KDE-Apps.org reveals that new apps are added daily. I periodically browse through the latest KDE apps to see if anything stands out, and I found these five, some of which are in early development.

Linux Mint: the tastier Ubuntu: Launched in October of 2004, Linux Mint has rapidly emerged as one of the most popular desktop Linux distributions. In this review, LinuxTrends takes a look at the latest Linux Mint release and finds it to be preferable to Ubuntu (on which it’s based) in several significant ways.

Happy 27th Birthday GNU Project!: A hearty Happy 27th Birthday to the GNU Project! Here is a link to the original announcement of the GNU Project posted by Richard Stallman on September 27, 1983. Without the GNU project FOSS as we know it today would not exist. Thank You to everyone who works and has worked on the GNU project over the last 27 years. You have helped make the world a better place. We at LXer take our hats off to you.

How we build Ubuntu: Ubuntu is one of the most polished Linux distributions available, fusing the work of a global community of contributors who provide a diverse range of skills to make Ubuntu what it is. While we all enjoy the fruits of a new Ubuntu release every six months, many people have asked the team over the years how this wide range of contributors manage to come together to build a new Ubuntu release.

Linux in Schools: Why schools should have students use and learn Linux instead of some other OS. What computer operating system should students learn at school? Most schools use MS Windows or Mac, but a number have switched or are in the process of switching to Linux. For schools the advantages are lower costs, greater security, no viruses or spyware, easier upgrades and better reliability. Lastly, there are very few licensing hassles or concerns about pirated software.

Red Hat Linux is Mad Money: Over the years, I’ve heard a lot of different people try and explain the economic proposition that open source and Linux offers. One of the best such explanations I’ve ever heard came on CNBC’s Mad Money show this week during which host Jim Cramer was interviewing Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst. With Red Hat, Cramer noted that it is a disruptive force and that’s what makes it attractive. His view is that in tech, disruptive forces are the most valuable types of companies.

Microsoft sues Motorola over patents, citing Android phones: Microsoft has filed suit against Motorola, alleging that the mobile phone maker’s Android-based smartphones violate nine of the Redmond company’s patents. Motorola promised to “vigorously defend” against the allegations, citing the strength of its own intellectual property portfolio.

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Could things be more exciting in the the world of FOSS right now? Yes it could, but let’s not be too hasty..

Oracle buys Sun and proceeds to use its patent portfolio to sue Google for infringement. Openoffice.org is going to have to split off or separate itself from Oracle somehow or change its licensing to remain free. Paul Allen unloads a patent Gatling Gun on every big name is the Tech industry. Is it going to be Red Hat or VMware that will take over the ailing Novell? Mandriva has broken into pieces. I’ll keep going if you let me..

It seems that the SCO trial has finally come to an end but even in the settling of the dust the lawyers can’t stop filing motions. The Oracle-Sun deal looks to be the next long term big story in FOSS I believe. The possible implications for FOSS with Oracle now owning one of the most extensive technology patent portfolios outside of IBM mean that there are more exciting times ahead, if that is what you want to call it.

All the while Microsoft still puts out tasty pieces of FUD every so often and I have come to find it reassuring in its consistency. But again Oracle could easily displace Microsoft as the Darth Vader of FOSS if they decide to go on the offensive with their patents, which looks likely to me. Larry Ellison is certainly tall enough for the part..

Ubuntu continues to grow, deepen its impact and cement its status as “The other word for Linux” to those who probably have no idea what FOSS is but are ten times more likely to have heard the word Ubuntu before Linux. I say that because I have been the person talking about Linux and/or Free and Open Source Software with someone for their very first time, many many times. I have seen how in the last several years Ubuntu has permeated the tech industry, just in name alone most of the time, many people having heard of it but not knowing exactly what it is. It is truly amazing.

It has looked to me like the tide continues to rise in the world of FOSS and as such its visibility does too. Things have continued to change at an ever quickening pace since my time managing our newswire. In the past decade alone Linux and FOSS have gone from their stone age to the space age. Could it be that FOSS is growing up too fast for its own good? Much like in the 19th century American West? Are we getting too big for our own britches?

Something I am starting to see as well are the beginnings of the far-reaching effects of Open Source ideals in communication and philosophy, which have the possibility of positively touching everyone on the planet. I can only imagine what the impact of FOSS on human society will look like in the next 20 or 30 years. I have started to see these things and ask myself these questions recently and I wonder what others would say in response to them. So I’m asking, what do you think?

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LXer Article

The big stories to hit our newswire this week raised some questions it seems. We have Joe Brockmeier asking why e-mail is still stuck in the 1990’s, who is in the running to buy Novell, could it be VMWare or possibly even Red Hat? Steve Rosenberg is intrigued by the latest Linux Mint, a review of TinyCore 3.0, Linux applications with peculiar names, the bully in the Linux schoolyard and to wrap things up we have some Microsoft FUD on how Android is not really free. Enjoy!

TinyCore Linux 3.0: Graphical Linux distribution under 11 Megabyte: If you thought Damn Small Linux or Puppy Linux is small, hold your breath. Tiny Core Linux is a minimalistic GNU/Linux distribution based on Linux kernel 2.6, it comes with graphical environment and provides facility to download and install applications from the Internet and it fits into 10MB of ISO file.

Here is the New Open Source: A recent column in The H Open posed a question: ‘The “best open source software for business” list contains almost exclusively well-known contributors. Is there no more new open source?’ It’s an important issue, because it picks up on a persistent line of criticism that goes all the way back to the famous 1998 Halloween Document, an internal Microsoft strategy report that offered perhaps the first deep glimpse into the company’s thinking about open source..

Court Upholds End-User License Agreements: The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently ruled that End-User License Agreements (EULAs) are absolutely binding, thereby making resale, redistribution, modifications and any other terms forbidden within the agreement illegal.

Why is Linux Email Stuck in the 90s?: Email, love it or loathe it, there’s no getting away from it. On an average day I process hundreds of emails, but haven’t yet found an open source mail user agent (MUA) that I really like. Ten years ago this wasn’t surprising, but today? Why aren’t open source mailers keeping up with the rest of the Linux desktop, and being blown away by Gmail?

The Bully In The Linux Schoolyard: There are plenty of people who have offered explanations for why Linux thrives anonymously on servers and as Android on smartphones but lags behind on the desktop. Though reasons abound, at least one significant one is a self-inflicted wound: the Terminal Bully.

First impressions of Linux Mint Debian — I’m more than a little intrigued: Linux Mint, long known as a multimedia-ready spin on Ubuntu, has gone deeper and released a Mint distro based not on Ubuntu but on Debian Testing, and my first impressions running the system from the live DVD is that this is a game-changer in the Linux world.

Novell Sale: VMware Among the Bidders?: It sounds like Novell is nearing a deal to sell itself. Newspaper and wire report rumors suggest VMware is bidding to buy Novell’s SUSE Linux business, with another buyer to potentially acquire Novell’s other businesses. Here’s the speculation plus insights from The VAR Guy.

Red Hat in the market for Novell?: Red Hat, Inc. was named by the Wall Street Journal yesterday to be one of the potential purchasers of Novell, which the New York Post announced would sell itself in two parts; Linux will go to a strategic buyer and the remainder will be sold to private equity, Jefferies reports. The other companies mentioned were VMware, Oracle, and EMC.

Linux Applications With Peculiar Names: I’m sure most of us were put before in the situation of discovering a new great application, but had to stop and try to figure out how to actually read and spell its name letter by letter.

Linux and Too Many Choices: A perennial whinge is “Linux and FOSS have too many choices! It’s confusing and scary!” So what’s the answer, a single global dictator? It must be the season for recycled anti-Linux whinges, because in the past few weeks I have had the pleasure of wading through a flurry of stories about Linux has too many choices, Linux is not ready for prime time, Linux is too expensive just like proprietary software, and FOSS is amateur hour and all insecure. We’ve heard it all before.

Microsoft says patent-infringing Android isn’t really free: Google’s open source Android operating system is not as free as it seems, Microsoft argues, because it infringes a number of patents. When asked whether open source models created problems for vendors with licensed software, the software giant went on the offensive. “It does infringe on a bunch of patents, and there’s a cost associated with that,” Tivanka Ellawala, Microsoft financial officer told MarketWatch. “So there’s a… cost associated with Android that doesn’t make it free.”

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There is nothing quite like a good conversation and we have a plethora of articles that started many a good one in our forums this past week including Abiword has smart quotes, what technology has Microsoft ever been the first to market with? Another “There are too many Linux’s” article and look out, your Linux system fell down and it can’t get up. Enjoy!

What does Paul Allen think he’s doing!?: For years, decades, the big companies didn’t tend to wage patent wars on each other. The reason is simple. Major patent holders don’t tend to target other major patent holders because of MAD (mutually assured destruction). Or, in other words, if you sue me, I sue you, and we can both burn potentially hundreds of millions per year in legal costs just to conduct a business fight. Well that was the case until Oracle went after Google and now Allen is suing the world.

Abiword has smart quotes!!: I haven’t run the AbiWord word processor in an age. I barely ever run OpenOffice, or MS Office, or any office software outside of Google Docs. I decided to fire it up, and while I was looking for the word-wrap settings (still don’t know if these exist …) instead learned that AbiWord now offers SMART QUOTES. Now if you read entries from this blog in 2007, you could glean that I was somewhat obsessed with smart quotes in word-processing documents.

Retired joint chiefs chairman dons a Red Hat: What do you get when you cross a Red Hat with a Green Beret? I don’t know, but the commercial Linux and Java application server markets are about to find out. Retired General Henry Hugh Shelton — a native Tarheel born in Tarboro, North Carolina, and a former commander of the 82nd Airborne Division based in Fort Bragg — was named chairman of the board of directors at Red Hat on Monday.

27 good reasons to love Linux: Operating system not pay $ 400 The operating system is the set of programs responsible for the management and control of basic computer operations. A computer to function, it needs an operating system (there are several: Windows, Linux, Mac, etc. ..). If you take away the operating system, the computer serves only as an ornament. The most common is Windows and we have two options: buy or illegally copied (pirated). Windows Vista Prices range from $ 299 to $ 599, depending on version (Microsoft Official List).

A good trivia question: What technology has Microsoft been the first to market?: I am currently employed with a large global company, working in a division that strictly focuses on embedded Linux development. Earlier this week, during our lunch hour, as one would expect with a predominantly Linux crowd, we had engaged in a conversation on the following question: What technology has Microsoft been the first to market? And of those technologies, which was developed by Microsoft?

2010 Linux Graphics Survey: For the past three years we have hosted an annual Linux Graphics Survey in which we ask tens of thousands of users each time their video card preferences, driver information, and other questions about their view of the Linux graphics stack. This year we are hosting the survey once again to allow the development community to get a better understanding of the video hardware in use, what open-source and closed-source drivers are being used, and other relevant information that will help them and the Linux community.

Apple’s Relationship to Open Source: Despite being one of the most tightly controlled technology companies on the market, Apple has a surprisingly complicated relationship with open source. Both of Apple’s flagship operating systems, OS X and iOS are based on Darwin, which is in turn based on FreeBSD. Apple has also contributed a large amount of code back to the open source community, most notably WebKit, which is used as the browsing engine in nearly every mobile platform. Considering the recent popularity of Apple’s systems, and since there was a big Apple event happening today, their involvement in open source is worth a look.

The trouble with Linux: there’s too much choice: Those of you not familiar with Linux won’t be familiar with the way it lets you install new software. After 12 years with Linux, neither am I. And I think this highlights a serious problem with the way that open-source software has developed and how it can grow. The problem is choice – one of the most touted and noble reasons for using Linux in the first place. For general use, there’s too much of it. It’s often overwhelming, needlessly complicated and an easy excuse for change. Choice goes hand-in-hand with redundancy and duplicated effort.

Microsoft Patents Operating System Shutdown: Microsoft just received confirmation of a patent that hands the company the intellectual property of shutting an operating system down. I can’t quite recall how often Microsoft ha stalked about a faster way to shut down its operating system. It is part of the pitch of virtually every new operating system and it has remained an annoyance that it can take quite some time until the software in fact closes running applications and the operating system itself.

Your Linux system keeps falling and it can’t get up: Once in a while a Linux PC technician will encounter a system that has problems with lockups (a.k.a. hanging or freezing). Sometimes it is failing hardware but other times it’s a software problem. Here are the common causes for this and how to identify which is the source of your problems. While I predominantly use Ubuntu (and some Mandriva) these tests are valid for most any distribution.

Are You Intimidated By Breakfast Cereal?: An article by Graham Morrison for Tech Radar UK this past week struck a bit of a raw nerve for me. It was one of a type we see periodically in the tech press and the title pretty much tells the story: ?”The trouble with Linux: there’s too much choice.” To Mr. Morrison and all the others who have written articles like this one I say: Hogwash! I pose the following questions to Mr. Morrison and to all the others who share his views. Are you ?intimidated by the breakfast cereal isle in his supermarket? After all, there are so many choices. Isn’t it confusing? Should we all just eat corn flakes?

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LXer Article

In the Roundup this week we have a Faster and better Chrome 5 as well as 5 things you didn’t know VLC could do, Why rejecting Microsoft’s OSS contributions is counter-productive, Upgrading your distro should come with a warning and more. Enjoy!

No More Cheap Supercomputers? Sony Blocks Linux on PS3: Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA) faces a class action lawsuit following a recent an update to its PlayStation 3 console that removes the ability to put alternate operating systems on the console. The late March update for the PlayStation 3 restricts the installation of an alternative operating system to the console’s native OS. The feature, called ‘Install Other OS,’ has been removed, three years after the console’s introduction, “due to security concerns,” the company said in a blog post.

CLI on the Web: ..ECMA CLI would have given the web both strongly typed and loosely typed programming languages. It would have given developers a choice between performance and scriptability. A programming language choice (use the right tool for the right job) and would have in general made web pages faster just by moving performance sensitive code to strongly typed languages.

Chrome 5: Faster and Better: The first thing you’ll notice with Google’s new beta of its Chrome Web browser is that it’s faster, much faster, than the last version. You don’t need any fancy tests to see that. All you have to do is use it and you’ll see that it blows other browsers away.

4.4.3 Is Upon Us: KDE today released the 3rd monthly update to the 4.4 series, bringing a slew of bugfixes and translation updates to our users. Konsole has seen some love, so has Okular. Check out the changelog to get to know more about it. This release, as all our x.y.z releases (where z > 0) does not contain new features but concentrates on stabilizing the existing codebase. As such, the upgrade should be safe and painless, so we recommend updating to everyone running previous KDE SC versions.

5 Things You Didn’t Know VLC Could Do: There’s a good chance that if you’re reading this, you’re familiar with VLC, the high quality audio and video player for Linux, Mac, and Windows. Its speed, portability, and built-in support for most common codecs make VLC an extremely popular choice for playing video. While that’s all well and good, VLC can do a lot more than basic video playback, including things like video encoding, DVD ripping, volume normalization and more. Today we’ll look at some of VLC’s most interesting and little-known features that help make this an indispensable application for nearly all desktop platforms.

Upgrading your distro should come with a warning: It’s that time of year again when a lot of the major distros are putting out new releases, and people are clambering to get the new versions installed. But there are two camps of people in this rush to get the latest and greatest. The upgraders, who prefer to leave their computer as is, and hit the “upgrade” button, hoping to come back to their computers in a couple hours and revel in their shiny new OS. Then their are those who prefer the “clean install” by backing up any important stuff, wiping the drive, and starting from scratch. But is the upgrade method really worth it?

Tilting at Windows. Why rejecting Microsoft’s OSS contributions is counter-productive: Yesterday I had a look at the response of the Joomla! community to the news that Microsoft had signed the Joomla! Contributor Agreement and was contributing code to the content management project. You probably won’t be surprised to find that some people don’t like the idea. The speed and vehemence of their rejection of Microsoft’s involvement in the project is entirely predictable, but none the less depressing for that.

Linux needs to do more for programmers: Much as I hate to admit it, Microsoft does some things better, much better, than Linux. Number one with a bullet is how Microsoft helps programmers and ISVs (independent software vendors). MSDN (Microsoft Software Developer Network) is a wonderful online developer resource. Linux has had nothing to compare. True, there is the Linux Developer Network, which, when it began, looked like it would be the Linux equivalent of MSDN, but it hasn’t lived up to its promise. And, I can’t overlook the Linux Foundation’s Linux training classes. But, if I’m an ISV and I want to write software for Linux, I’m still going to need to piece together a lot of it by myself.

I had an epiphany (about Epiphany): The GNOME Web browser Epiphany — formerly based on Mozilla’s Gecko engine and now based on Webkit — doesn’t ship with Ubuntu (though it does with Debian and most GNOME-based distros/projects). But if you’re running GNOME, I recommend you add it via your favorite package manager. What Epiphany offers is a streamlined, faster, less-resource-intensive browsing experience.

 

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The big news this week was Ubuntu 10.04 being released and all the hoopla surrounding it, but not to be missed was HTC’s settlement with Microsoft over a Android patent deal, the challenges of Linux netbook design, Sony starts to feel the heat for blocking Linux installs on its PS3 and put windows to its most appropriate use, make a bootable Linux USB stick with it. Enjoy!

LXer Article

Windows Security: is Microsoft innocent?: How many times have you read about a worm spreading through an enterprise network, or some malware or other compromising personal data, or computers being used to build a DDoS or spammer botnet and either shouted BLOODY WINDOWS at the screen or seen someone else lay the blame squarely on Microsoft? Chances are, rather a lot I would imagine

EasyPeasy and the Challenges of Linux Netbook Design: Netbook desktops in free and open source software (FOSS) are in a state of rapid development. Should a netbook be treated as more as a mobile device than as a laptop? Should developers assume that netbooks are used for light computing such as social networking, rather than for productivity? These are just two of the questions whose answers affect the design of any netbook desktop.

Legalizing Linux DVD Playback: Why Bother?: I just finished writing that new book about Fedora 13 last night, so I’m feeling pretty good right now. It’s nice to have a project like that put to bed. Of course, when writing any beginner’s Linux book, invariably the topic of DVD playback comes up, and I always wrestle with what to tell new Linux users about the convoluted legal mess that watching a DVD on a Linux machine has become. For those who are unfamiliar, DVDs are encrypted with a content scrambling system (CSS) that is designed to prevent unauthorized machines from playing DVDs. What it’s really for, of course, is to prevent unauthorized machines from copying the content of a DVD, so illicit copies of Did You Hear About the Morgans? won’t be distributed freely across the Internet.

My Ubuntu 10.04 strategy: OK, so I had a not-so-great night running Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx — in release-candidate stage at this writing — and wondered what exactly made things so sluggish during a 2+ hour production session hacking away at Dailynews.com. Was it Firefox 3.6.x swallowing CPU and memory? All the social-networking and cloud-integration stuff running in the background? Xorg issues (which come and go with every kernel and Xorg update)? At this point I really don’t know.

Apple: Worse for open source than Microsoft?: Things need to change and Apple needs to be seen for what it really is: a threat to innovation and freedom. For as long as anyone can remember Microsoft has been seen as the primary enemy of free and open source software (FOSS). Free software advocates over the years have held Microsoft up as the pre-eminent example of how software should not be produced and distributed; an example of how they did not want it to be.

Question: Why switch to Linux or a Mac?: I’m no friend to Windows. I know the operating system too well to trust it. But, I did think that even though Windows is defective by design, you could keep it relatively safe by installing patches quickly and using anti-virus software religiously. I was wrong. First, it turns out that one of Microsoft’s latest Windows patches just flat out didn’t work. Whoops! This isn’t the first time that this has happened. But, what really caught my attention this go-around was that at just about the same time the news broke that a flawed McAfee Antivirus update knocked out millions of Windows XP computers. Talk about sloppy quality assurance! How the heck can a Windows anti-virus company release an update that locks XP computers into an endless reboot cycle?

HTC settles with Microsoft in Android patent deal: Microsoft and HTC have signed a patent agreement protecting the handset maker from Microsoft patent lawsuits over its industry-leading Android smartphones. HTC will pay royalties to Microsoft, which for the first time is enforcing its alleged Linux-related patents on an Android-based product — yet the agreement may help HTC defend against Apple’s Android-related lawsuit.

Ubuntu 10.04 is Released: Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid Lynx is released out into the world.

The Top 12 Native Linux System Monitoring Tools: System Administrators (SAs) have a tough job: Dealing with users and user accounts, security, patching, updates, upgrades, disk space, performance and other miscellaneous tasks often known as “other duties as assigned.” For some SAs, the day never ends. Despite the challenges, pitfalls and occasional irate user; system administration is a fulfilling job with intangible rewards like no other position in IT. To assist those weary SAs in their quest to conquer their Linux systems, I’ve devised this list of 12 native Linux system monitoring tools that are always at my fingertips.

Sony faces legal challenge over Linux block: Sony has been hit with a lawsuit over its recent decision to block the installation of Linux on its Playstation 3 console. The suit, filed in a San Francisco district court, accused the company of breaching its sales contract with users of older Playstation 3 systems when, in a recent firmware update, it disabled the ability to run a Linux partition on the console.

Put Windows to the Most Appropriate Use: Create a Bootable USB Stick with Ubuntu 10.04: The following steps provide two methods of putting the fresh new release of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx) on a USB stick. The first method will create a bootable USB stick with a live version and the second process will create a live version with persistence. Both methods are an excellent way to always have your favorite Ubuntu system and software with you at all times and it makes for one of the simplest ways to conduct an install to a hard drive.

Pot, meet kettle: a response to Steve Jobs’ letter on Flash: Watching two proprietary software companies deeply opposed to computer user freedom lob accusations back and forth about who is more opposed to freedom has been surreal, to say the least. But what’s been crystal clear is that the freedom these companies are arguing about is their own, not that of their users. And what they are calling freedom isn’t freedom at all—it is the ability to control those users. Adobe is mad at Apple for not letting Adobe control iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch users via Flash, and Apple is mad at Adobe for suggesting that Apple is arbitrarily abusing its control over Application Store users.

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