Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘IBM’ Category

LXer Article

In the Roundup this week we have news of IBM deciding to back Oracle’s OpenJDK instead of Harmony, Phoronix releases the 2010 Linux graphics survey results, 5 mistakes Linux newcomers make and lastly John E. Dunn gets the crazy idea to ditch Windows for Ubuntu. Enjoy!

IBM backs Oracle against Apache and Google’s Android: Oracle is no longer totally isolated on Java — IBM now stands with the giant, in a move that potentially stymies Google’s Android. IBM said Monday that it’s putting its efforts into the OpenJDK project, run by Oracle, and switching away from the Apache Software Foundation’s (ASF’s) Project Harmony on Java Standard Edition (Java SE).

Was Taken For Granted, Now Forgotten: I found a computing treasure in a local Goodwill store three weeks ago: a book about System/360 assembly language. (Assembly language is the human-readable form of the concrete instructions carried out by the computer.) In earlier years, this would have been a wonderful surprise, but a previous find precludes that from happening… Last year, I found a special treat in the discount bin of a local grocery store: a movie, in Mongolian. In the rural Midwest USA, that is difficult to surpass that for surprise finds.

2010 Linux Graphics Survey Results: Last month we carried out our fourth annual Linux Graphics Survey in which we sought feedback from the Linux community about the most common graphics drivers and hardware in use, what display/GPU-related features desktop users are most interested in, and collect other metrics to aide developers.

Linux Gaming: Wine vs. Cedega vs. CrossOver Games: In previous posts, I have highlighted some of the outstanding new native Linux games that are coming out soon or have been out but may not be well known. For many Linux gamers, however, the pool of native Linux games is still too small. As most already know, it is possible to play some Windows games in Linux using Wine. Additionally, there are two prominent commercial spin-offs of Wine that are both designed specifically for gaming: Cedega and CrossOver Games. At one time, there was little difference between the three, other than the graphical configuration interfaces

Top 5 mistakes by Linux first-timers: With the arrival of Ubuntu 10.10, the list of reasons to try Linux for your business just got a little longer. The free and open source operating system is now more user-friendly than it’s ever been before while still offering the many security and other advantages it has over its competitors. If you’re among the legions of new Linux users out there, congratulations on making a smart move! Now that you’re on your way to a lifetime of freedom from high costs, vendor lock-in, constant malware attacks, and the many other disadvantages associated with Windows and Mac OS X, you should be aware of some of the classic mistakes Linux newcomers sometimes make.

Here’s a crazy security idea – ditch Windows for Ubuntu 10.10 Linux: After some days with the latest Ubuntu Linux desktop release, I was planning to devote a few graphs to extolling its many virtues. This is not a hard exercise because Ubuntu 10.10 is exemplary, about as good as it gets at doing the main things desktop operating systems were originally invented to do. It’s refined, uncluttered, comes with plenty of apps for most people and, most of all, it’s stable and fast. It runs happily in 1GB of RAM, something no version of Windows has done since the obsolete XP. There’s even a netbook edition with larger icons.

Is Linux Gaining share at Windows Expense? Maybe, Maybe not: The study also doesn’t shed much light on potential hybrid deployments where Linux is deployed alongside Windows and Unix. “We didn’t ask that question exactly,” McPherson said. “I bet you are correct that many would be hybrid, and that would be good to ask next time.”

KDE 4 vs. GNOME 3: An Early Comparison: How will GNOME 3 compare to KDE 4? The picture is still emerging, since GNOME 3’s official release is still months away. However, with GNOME Shell available as a preview in the latest GNOME releases, a general outline is starting to be visible. Of course, some elements cannot be compared yet. It would be unfair, for instance, to compare panels in any detail, because in the previews GNOME Shell’s panel has neither applets nor configurations. Nor, for that matter, can much be said yet about the upcoming KDE 4.6, which should be the latest version when GNOME 3.0 is released.

Read Full Post »

LXer Article

This week we have Jim Zemlin and SJVN weighing in on IBM’s supposed breaking of their own pledge to open source many of their patents. Are HP and Dell giving up on netbooks? What will come after Linux? Jack Wallen sees the future, a review of Tiny Me and much more in this week’s LXWR.

Are HP and Dell giving up on netbooks?
: Faced with disappointing sales, HP and Dell are scaling back investments in 10-inch netbooks, with HP possibly quitting the format entirely, according to DigiTimes. Other motivators were said to include expectations for re-invigorated sales of larger, more expensive notebooks fueled by a recovering economy.

I have seen the future, and it is GNOME 3
: Today I finally managed to get GNOME Shell installed so I could get a preview of what is to come on the Linux desktop (at least through the eyes of GNOME). This new GNOME will arrive sometime this year (2010) and will, I promise you, change the way you use your desktop. Finally someone has looked at the current desktop metaphor and said “It’s over!” Think about it, the current paradigm has been in play since, when, Windows 95? Earlier you say? CDE? Let’s stick with Windows 95, because that really solidified the whole “taskbar, start button, icons, notification try” metaphor in the eyes of the public. Well, public, that is about to change – drastically.

IBM breaks OSS patent promise, targets mainframe emulator: IBM is threatening to pursue legal action against TurboHercules, a company that sells services relating to the open source Hercules project, an emulator that allows conventional computers with mainstream operating systems to run software that is designed for IBM System Z mainframe hardware. In a letter that IBM mainframe CTO Mark Anzani recently sent to TurboHercules, Big Blue says that it has “substantial concerns” that the Hercules project infringes on its patents. The letter is a brusque half-page, but was sent with nine additional pages that list a “non-exhaustive” selection of patents that IBM believes are infringed by the open source emulator.

Top 5 most useful commands or tools for Linux administrators: There are plenty such tools which are definitely very useful for Linux admins. Here I am just trying to figure out 5 of such useful tools which are used by a normal Linux administrator in day to day operations. A tool which I think is most useful may not fit in your usage and its definitely possible that you know some awesome tool which I forgot to include here, for such case, I am requesting hereby to please mention the tool in comments. One more thing, I am mentioning here tools which are somewhat optional and not absolutely required for everybody and excluding tool which have no viable alternative and every Linux admin have to use them.. such as SSH, SCP etc.

What will come after Linux?: Lets face it. Nothing lasts for ever. No matter how much we enjoy that perfect meal, movie, romance or whatever it will always be relegated to the past. The same with operating systems. They have come and gone. While there still may be pockets of them floating around in obscure places, such operating systems like DOS, OS/2, AmigaOS, GEOS and windows are either dead, dying or, like a turtle on its back, scrabbling around feverishly but going nowhere.

Is the Desktop Becoming Legacy?: A few years ago I wrote on OSNews several articles (1,2) about workstations. After three years I had to stop, because there were no workstations left on the market, they became legacy and were not sold any more. Now with the rise of mobile devices with touchscreen and wireless network connectivity virtually everywhere, the question becomes valid, what will happen with the desktop computers, are they still needed, or will they follow the workstations on their way to computer museums?

IBM’s Open Source Patent Pledge: For those of us that have worked for years in open source, rumors in the press of IBM “breaking its open source patent pledge” were met with a bit of dismay. IBM is one of the top contributors to the Linux kernel and dozens of critical open source projects. For more than a decade IBM has been a good citizen in the open source community. To get to the bottom of things I contacted Dan Frye, VP of Open Systems Development at IBM and member of the Linux Foundations board of directors, to “say it wasn’t so.” Fortunately all of us can breathe easy – IBM remains true to their word.

Opinion: Get Off IBM’s Back Already!: The recent attacks on IBM patent use by some in the open-source community are way out of line. First things first, I hate software patents as much as the next open-source supporter, but the recent claims that IBM has betrayed open-source with recent patent claims are way over the top. If it were just one person throwing mud at IBM I wouldn’t bother with responding to this, but with many other open-source advocates are jumping with both feet on IBM over the issue, I have to address it.

Proprietary Licenses Are Even Worse Than They Look: “There are lots of evil things that proprietary software companies might do. Companies put their own profit above the rights and freedoms of their users, and to that end, much can be done that subjugates users. Even as someone who avoids proprietary software, I still read many proprietary license agreements (mainly to see how bad they are).”

Ubuntu Is A Poor Standard Bearer For Linux: While Linux is a power to be reckoned with in the enterprise server room it continues to struggle for acceptance on the consumer desktop. On the desktop the most popular distributions, far and away, are Ubuntu and Fedora. Which one is more popular is an ongoing debate between the companies. However, when it comes to Linux media and the wider tech press there is no contest: Ubuntu has mindshare and gets the lion’s share of media coverage. For Linux on the desktop Ubuntu is the de facto standard bearer. To whatever part of the general non-geek public is even aware of Linux the names “Linux” and “Ubuntu” are all but interchangeable. Over the past few years I’ve come to the conclusion that this state of affairs is, at best, unfortunate.

TinyMe – A tiny OS for old computers: TinyMe is a lightweight linux OS, it is aimed at making the computing experience as bloat- and lag-free as possible. It is well-suited to older computers, enthusiasts devoted to small/fast systems.

Microsoft to develop own open source platform: Open source developer at Microsoft, Garrett Serack announced today plans to bring a native running open source platform to Windows. In a blog posted today, Serack announced the Common Opensource Application Publishing Platform (CoApp). The post outlines the challenges of developing open source applications in a Windows environment and the differences between developing on UNIX and Linux and Windows.

Read Full Post »

LXer Article

eyeOS: Your Own Private Linux Cloud that You Control (part 1): Cloud computing is a relativity new computing concept where resources are provided via the Internet instead of on the local computer or network. It’s virtualization over the Internet. Eric Geier introduces eyeOS, the do-it-yourself cloud that keeps control in your hands.

Why virus writers are turning to open source: Malware developers are going open source in an effort to make their malicious software more useful to fraudsters. By giving criminal coders free access to malware that steals financial and personal details, the malicious software developers are hoping to expand the capabilities of old Trojans. According to Candid Wuest, threat researcher with security firm Symantec, around 10 percent of the Trojan market is now open source.

IBM Linux chief: Chasing desktop Windows a ‘dead-end’: IBM says that battling for desktop market share against Windows is a “dead-end” for Linux. Bob Sutor, IBM’s vp of open source and Linux for IBM, opened the inaugural LinuxCon conference held in Portland, Oregon on Monday with predictions for the open source desktop, telling developers they won’t thrive unless they specialize. Given his connections to Big Blue, Sutor unsurprisingly (and justifiably) praised Linux for its cloud, mainframe, and hardware-specific ubiquity. But he opined that winning hearts in the general market is a different story altogether.

The Possible Futures of the Linux Desktop: What is the future of the Linux desktop? According to Bob Sutor, vice president of open source and Linux at IBM (NYSE: IBM), it’s not about dominating the desktop landscape or being a drop-in replacement for Microsoft Windows. In fact, during his keynote at the LinuxCon conference today, Sutor said he doesn’t see Linux ever dominating the desktop space. “I think trying to make it a complete drop-in replacement is a dead-end strategy,” Sutor said. “They’ve got a little bit more money, and even more important than that is they’ve got the market share and the mind share.”

Linus calls Linux ‘bloated and huge’: Linux creator Linus Torvalds says the open source kernel has become “bloated and huge,” with no midriff-slimming diet plan in sight. During a roundtable discussion at LinuxCon in Portland, Oregon this afternoon, moderator and Novell distinguished engineer James Bottomley asked Tovalds whether Linux kernel features were being released too fast, before the kernel is stabilized. Citing an internal Intel study that tracked kernel releases, Bottomley said Linux performance had dropped about two per centage points at every release, for a cumulative drop of about 12 per cent over the last ten releases. “Is this a problem?” he asked. “We’re getting bloated and huge. Yes, it’s a problem,” said Torvalds.

Microsoft accused of ‘ulterior motive’ in Linux patent sale: Does the troll-blocking organization that recently secured a set of supposedly Linux-related patents from Microsoft need sizing for a penguin-shaped tinfoil hat? Or was the IP sale really Redmond’s secret scheme to “create fear, uncertainty, and doubt” in the open-source community?

Mr. Torvalds, Shrink That Kernel: Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel, said at the LinuxCon in Portland yesterday that, “We are not the streamlined, small, hyper-efficient kernel I envisioned 15 years ago,” he said. “Our kernel is huge and bloated. Whenever we add a new feature, it only gets worse.” It’s time to put Linux on a diet. What we need is a very small kernel that loads support via external files. Though Linux is a modular kernel, it seems that everything gets compiled in to the central code slug but I have a solution.

Ellison: No MySQL spin off: Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle, has made it clear that he is not prepared to spin off Sun’s MySQL business in an attempt to placate the European Commission investigation of competition issues with Oracle’s planned acquisition of Sun. The deal has already been approved by US authorities and Ellison thinks that the European Commission will follow saying “I think once they do their job, they’re going to come to the same conclusion”.

Does the Linux desktop need to be popular?: Does Linux desktop even need to be popular? There are, shall we say, differing options among the open source cognoscenti gathered in Portland, Oregon this week for the annual LinuxCon. For the last eight years, we’ve been told it’s the year of the Linux desktop. Yet penetration figures have remained somewhere in the region of 0 to 1 per cent. The top brass at the Linux Foundation don’t seem particularly interested in desktop uptake these days. They prefer to press towards successes in end-user device and mobile phone markets rather than worrying about turning hearts against Windows and OS X.

Bob Sutor – Here Are Your “Dead Ends”: Hey…slip off that 1000 dollar suit Bob and change into jeans and a t-shirt, swap out those Gucci loafers for a pair of 25 dollar sneakers and spend some time with me. I’m going to show you why Linux on the Desktop is anything but a dead end. Meet just a few of those that would call you “disconnected” for your statements.

Microsoft and Intel port Silverlight to Linux: Intel and Microsoft have announced a new port of Silverlight to Linux, specifically for the Intel-sponsored Moblin operating system running on Atom-powered devices such as netbooks. The port enables Intel to include Silverlight as a supported runtime in the Atom Developer Program, which will feed an iPhone-like App Store. Microsoft has already provided Intel with Silverlight source code and test suites. Intel will build an optimized Moblin version of Silverlight, which Microsoft will supply to OEMs. There are a couple of surprising aspects to the announcement. One is that a Linux implementation of Silverlight already exists, the open source Moonlight project. We asked Microsoft’s Brian Goldfarb, director of the Developer Platform Group, why Moonlight was not being used for Atom devices.

Microsoft: Google Chrome Frame makes IE less secure: The release of Google Chrome Frame, a new open source plugin that injects Chrome’s renderer and JavaScript engine into Microsoft’s browser, earlier this week had many web developers happily dancing long through the night. Finally, someone had found a way to get Internet Explorer users up to speed on the Web. Microsoft, on the other hand, is warning IE users that it does not recommend installing the plugin. What does the company have against the plugin? It makes Internet Explorer less secure.

Could Windows 7 Lead Us From Recession: It’s always hard to believe pre-release hype where Microsoft is concerned, but if Windows 7 is as stable as early reports suggest, it could mean more companies bent on using Microsoft anyway, will make the switch, and when they do chances are they’ll need to upgrade their hardware. And that could be an economic boost.

Flip Flops Are Evil: It’s always interesting, as well as incredibly frustrating, when a company takes a stand on an issue and then switches back and forth based on what best suits it on any particular day. There’s a word for taking a stand against something and then doing it yourself, but we’re not going to use that word. More than a few people have been using it to describe a growing feud between two of the biggest names from the old order and the new.

Read Full Post »

LXer Article

Linux Course: Understanding the GRUB Bootloader: This course provides a basic understanding of GRUB and gives you some illustrations on how to secure it and fix several common problems. GRUB stands for Grand Unified Bootloader and was created in 1995 by Erich Boleyn as he wanted to have a multiboot option. Intel based motherboards must be started with a 16-bit operating system because of a limitation to 640 kilobytes of RAM at startup. GRUB is used to facilitate the 16-bit requirement and load the 32-bit Linux kernel. The AMD CMOS is 64-bit so it can load the 64-bit kernel for Linux. In order for GRUB to work it must use a three step process on CentOS.

New Anti-Linux Propaganda from Microsoft : Screenshots obviously conditioning PC sales personnel to lie about Linux have been discovered in a US forum hosting Windows 7 training modules.

Red Hat hypervisor tools to run on Windows only: Open-source company Red Hat will initially offer its hypervisor management tools for Windows systems only. Paul Cormier, Red Hat’s president of products and technologies, told ZDNet Asia’s sister site, ZDNet UK at a press conference last week that the hypervisor management software for desktops and servers, which is due out before the end of the year, will be available only for systems running Microsoft’s proprietary operating system.

OpenOffice.org: The Limits of Readability and Grammar Extensions: OpenOffice.org: The limits of readability and grammar extensions As a professional writer, my software needs are simple. Give me a text editor — preferrably Bluefish, but vim or OpenOffice.org Writer will do — and I have all I need. However, judging by the number of aids available for writers, I am obviously in the minority. Novel-plotting databases, daily word counters, character generators — if you can imagine the software, you can probably find at least one example. I am fascinated by all the ingenuity, but most of the time I conclude that, if you know enough to use any of these tools without them leading you into greater difficulties, you can do without them. The OpenOffice.org extensions Readability Report and Language Tool are two applications that illustrate my point perfectly.

Opinion: Is Novell Selling FUD or Linux?: Companies with inferior products are often tempted to create Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. Paul Rubens wonder if Novell’s FUD campaign a sign of a company that is afraid of the truth.

Ingo Molnar Tests New BF Scheduler: Kernel developer Ingo Molnar has done a benchmark test to compare his Completely Fair Scheduler (CFS) with the recently released BFS from Australian Con Kolivas.

Protecting Linux from Microsoft (Yes, Microsoft Got Caught): Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal’s Nick Wingfield broke a story on Microsoft selling a group of patents to a third party. The end result of this story is good for Linux, even though it doesn’t placate fears of ongoing attacks by Microsoft. Open Invention Network, working with its members and the Linux Foundation, pulled off a coup, managing to acquire some of the very patents that seem to have been at the heart of recent Microsoft FUD campaigns against Linux. Break out your white hats: the good guys won.

OLPC News Exclusive: XO-1.5 Laptop Debut and Speed Test vs. Overclocked XO-1 Laptop: Tonight we experienced a world premier – the XO-1.5 laptop from OLPC debuted at the OLPC Learning Club DC – and we broadcast it live via OLPC News on Twitter. This newest laptop from OLPC features the VIA C7-M a 1GHz variable speed processor, which SJ Klein of OLPC says will empower learning in several key ways..

Five Features We Want to See in Ubuntu: Ubuntu isn’t the only Linux operating system, but it’s where the dream of a usable, completely free desktop is closest to reality. If every Ubuntu developer were assembled at one place, here are five things we’d ask them to accomplish.

Microsoft Start Their Own Open Source Foundation: The CodePlex Foundation, a non-profit foundation formed with the mission of enabling the exchange of code and understanding among software companies and open source communities, launched today, September 10, 2009. Incorporated as a 501.c6 non-profit, the CodePlex Foundation was created as a forum in which open source communities and the software development community can come together with the shared goal of increasing participation in open source community projects. The CodePlex Foundation will complement existing open source foundations and organizations, providing a forum in which best practices and shared understanding can be established by a broad group of participants, both software companies and open source communities. Initial funding for the Foundation comes from Microsoft Corporation.

LifeHacker and Ubuntu: A Response: Recently LifeHacker had an article talking about five things they would like to see in Ubuntu. The article is very supportive of Ubuntu, and we appreciate that LifeHacker folks, and I wanted to follow up with a few notes about each of the five areas they focused on, particularly with relation to the recently released Alpha 5 development snapshot of the up-and-coming Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala.

IBM Throws Out Microsoft Office : 360.000 IBM workers have been told to stop using Microsoft Office and switch to the Open Office-based software Symphony.

Read Full Post »

LXer Article

Fullscreen flash video in GNU/Linux: “First, if you are unfamiliar with the problem, go to YouTube, pick any video, and double-click on the video, or click on the little fullscreen icon, and you’ll see that the video begins to get really slow, and choppy, from dropping frames.”

Audacious 2.1 Review – Powerful Audio Replacement for XMMS: Audacious is a powerful audio player for Linux which resembles the older XMMS, only using GTK2 toolkit for its interface. It supports XMMS and implicitly Winamp 2.x skins, coming with support for various audio formats, including MP3, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec) or WMA (Windows Media Audio).

42 Hot Free Linux Games (Part 3 of 3): Linux enjoys a very large software library of games, the vast majority of which can be downloaded without any payment. Helping to identify great games is made difficult by the fact that to a large extent games are a matter of taste. Furthermore, some players prefer games of tactics, others enjoy the communication with fellow gamers. There are those who hanker for games that require quick reflexes, or which truly challenge the mind.

An Open Letter to Michael Dell: Why I have no choice but return my Ubuntu Inspiron Mini 10: I have been a fan of yours for many years — since I was a kid in fact! I watched as you created Dell, one of the first (“the” first?) companies that sold computers by mail order. I watched you become wealthy, successful, and then retire, only to come back to Dell to remind its managers what they seemed to have forgotten: listen to your customers. I watched you embrace GNU/Linux; I remember thinking: I wonder if people realise what this will actually mean. I am sure he does. So, here I am: I bought an Inspiron Mini 10. I have no choice but return it. And now I can’t stop wondering: how could Michael Dell get it just so wrong?

Canonical Contributing Too Little to Kernel Development? : This week the Linux Foundation published statistics of the persons and companies behind the kernel development. Canonical is not mentioned at all.

Top 5: Linux Video Editing Software: A non-linear editing system (NLE) is a video editing (NLVE) or audio editing (NLAE) system which can provide editing method for video clips or frams. You will be able to access any frame in a video clip. Non-linear editing is done for film and television post-production. However, the cost of editing system gone down and non-linear editing tools (including software) are now within the reach of most home users.

Judge overturns 2007 Unix copyright decision: A federal appeals court Monday overturned a 2007 decision that Novell owns the Unix code, and the ruling now clears the way for SCO to pursue a $1 billion copyright infringement case against IBM. In a 54-page decision, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals said it was reversing the 2007 summary judgment decision by Judge Dale Kimball of the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah, which found that Novell was the owner of Unix and UnixWare copyrights.

Why Windows security is awful: A friend of mine suggested that I should include as boilerplate in my security stories, a line like: “Of course, if you were running desktop Linux or using a Mac, you wouldn’t have this problem.” She’s got a point. Windows is now, always has been, and always will be insecure. Here’s why.

Mini-notebook sales jump 398%, desktops shunned: Report: Australian sales of mini-notebooks jumped a massive 398.4% in the second quarter of this year, compared with 12 months ago. It’s clear evidence that consumers prefer mobile PCs, even when they come with a higher price tag than a desktop equivalent.

The Linux Home Office: What’s In Your Cyberspace?: What does your home computer lab look like? Do you have a dedicated office, a corner of the living room, a lounge-in-bed setup? Maybe you’re set up more like an old-fashioned terminal server, with a big workstation in a closet and several remote PCs. Maybe you have whittled your computing herd down to a single sleek laptop.

Secure VoIP, GNU SIP Witch, and replacing Skype with free software: For a number of years I have been when possible working on what is called the GNU Telephony Secure Calling initiative to make communication intercept a thing of the past, whether for individuals, private organizations, or national governments, and to do so entirely using free software.

How do You Really Measure Linux Bloat?: In the last article, Akkana Peck talked about the different types of Linux memory and how deceptive values like Virtual Size and Resident Set Size can be. Today she shows us how to get more useful numbers so we can figure out which programs really are memory hogs.

Windows Loses Money, Linux Nears $1 Billion Mark: In a time when Microsoft is feeling the full impact of the global economic downturn, the open-source Linux operating system is flourishing. While Windows client revenue has let the Redmond company suffering in the 2009 fiscal year, producing three quarters inferior when compared to FY2008, Linux revenue continues to grow and is right on track of making the open-source OS a $1 billion a year business. Market analysis firm IDC estimates that between 2008 and 2013 Linux revenue will deliver a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of no less than 16.9%.

Read Full Post »

LXer Article

Wine, you can’t live with or without it, it seems, the Berkeley Linux Users Group put up a great review of Mephisto Backup v1.5, Juliet Kemp shows one way to protect your root password, and it looks like Sugar is ultimately going to win because no one is buying XO’s with XP on them apparently. Google Chrome 2.0 was released this past week, its amazing to me that Chrome already has twice the browser market share than Opera but then we all know about market share statistics don’t we?

Our own Hans Kwint in response to an article that hit our newswire and the many conversations it started tells us why Linux doesn’t need marketing. For my part I think Hans nails it, its not that Linux that needs to be marketed, its consumers need to be given that choice. Ken Starks has a run in with a couple of Acer trusted computing BIOS issues, but fret not my friends, it has a happy ending.

David Lane asks “Why are you not running Apache?“, Caitlyn Martin in an article that comes on the tail of a slew of articles on Netbook maket that “Linux To Regain 50% Netbook Market Share“, another article asks “Netbook Market? What Netbook Market?” and a Heise article talks about a study of Linux on the company desktop commissioned by IBM. Even though Cisco fairly quickly settled out of court Justin Ryan makes the case for gloom and doom in defending the GPL and last but not least I leave you with a tasty morsel of ‘when more people use it it will get attacked’ FUD with “OSS attacks will grow with adoption“.

Read Full Post »

LXer Article

The biggest story of the week was by far the purchase of Sun, not by IBM but Oracle, which has many FOSS proponents worried about the Open Source projects that Sun is an integral part of. I agree with SJVN’s take on it and it explains why Oracle had “Dr DBA” himself appear on stage at the MySQL annual conference only days later.

Red Hat commissioned the Georgia Institute of Technology to do a study on the use of Open Source software around the world and they have now published a map based on the information they gathered. Ever forgot your root password? don’t feel bad, I did that once. Here are 10 ways of resetting a lost Linux root password that may help out. Linux Magazine has a two part interview with Linus Torvalds, here is Part 1 and Part 2.

We have Groklaw to thank for posting a most intriguing history of history of Microsoft’s anti competitive behavior. Not to mention that if you end up with a computer that has Windows 7 Starter Edition, your going to have to learn to live with some limitations. There has been a sighting of a Netbook with Android pre-installed out in the wild and Steven Rosenberg sparks a good ole’ fashion desktop environment debate with his “Xfce is light … but Fvwm is lighter“.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »